News Letter January 2022

The full version of HIWeather News Letter January 2022
January 2022
January 2022

Dear Colleagues,

 

My co-chair, Brian Golding, and I would like to wish you a Happy New Year as we move swiftly into 2022.

HIWeather is one of three projects under the World Weather Research Programme of the World Meteorological Organization. We are 7 years into the 10-year duration of the project, which aims to promote cooperative international research to improve resilience to high impact weather worldwide. You can find out more about our project on the website www.hiweather.net

In late 2021 we took a fresh look at the progress we had made so far and have decided to focus our attention on several cross-cutting projects for the remainder of our 10-year term. This means we will have less emphasis on our five task teams and their individual activities, and more emphasis on the joint activities our members are turning their efforts to.   

In 1948 it was recognised that “we desperately need a science of value. It is forthcoming, but its coming depends on the activity of the social scientist” (R.L. Ackoff, Philosophy of Science, 15(2) pg. 117). I’m pleased to say that our own interdisciplinary Value Chain project, led by Beth Ebert and facilitated by David Hoffmann is making great progress with the addition of new members (including social scientists!), the issuance of a glossary, and development of a draft questionnaire template that will be used to populate case study information. Aligned efforts by Jeff Lazo and Brian Mills have resulted in the publication on the Earth System Observations, Science and Services information value chain, which describes “how the broad set of social sciences – in addition to economics – can be used to study and improve the process” of operationalising the value chain concept for weather information.  You can find out more about the value chain activities further down in this newsletter.

The Citizen Science project, led by David Johnston and Marion Tan, has been sharing demonstration projects on our HIWeather website. It is building on the WMO Guidance Note that it issued in 2021 (available here), which is a great resource for anyone planning a citizen science initiative. The Citizen Science project is also aligning with the value chain project to investigate the role of citizen science in the value chain.

Our third flagship activity is the publication of the HIWeather book by Springer, edited by Brian. Puboication has been held back by disagreements on wording between lawyers in various places but progress is being made in the background and we look forward to sharing the book with you in 2022.

I am pleased to see such integration across the sciences in the HIWeather project. Furthermore, I look forward to progressing the integration of our science into practice throughout 2022, as Brian and I have recently been invited as focal points onto the WMO’s Standing Committee for Disaster Risk Reduction.

Please enjoy this newsletter edition, with a new look thanks to the HIWeather International Co-ordination Office. Thank you for your interest in HIWeather, and please be in touch – we welcome any feedback.


Best wishes,

Dr Sally Potter

Co-chair of HIWeather


Dr Sally Potter

Co-chair of HIWeather

NEWS

Progress of Scientific Research

RELEVANT MEETINGS

  • Fire and Climate Conference 2022:

    3-10September,online

    Website: https://fireandclimateconference.com/

    Abstract submission closed. Registration open.

  • Seventh WMO International Workshop on Monsoons (IWM-7):

CALLS & REQUESTS

Citizen Science project

Citizen Science project

Warning Value Chain  project

Warning Value Chain project

HIWeather Endorsement

HIWeather Endorsement

Facebook users

Facebook users

Twitter users

Twitter users

WeChat users

WeChat users

Citizen Science project


Submissions for the special issue of the Australasian Journal of Disaster and Trauma Studies are now due. 

Submission details are available at: http://trauma.massey.ac.nz/.

The survey of citizen science projects is open at https://massey.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_aaWCTHai8RFzBqJ

Please add details of your project.


Warning Value Chain project

We are developing an inventory of existing examples of where the value chain has been applied, based on a systematic review of academic and grey literature and workshops. 

If you know of relevant reports in peer reviewed journals or in the grey literature, please could you forward them to the project office at hiwico@cma.gov.cn


HIWeather Endorsement

The Steering Group (SG) of the High Impact Weather (HIWeather) Project provides endorsement for projects, programs and initiatives that plan to contribute to the goals of HIWeather as outlined in the HIWeather Implementation Plan. 

Projects seeking endorsement through HIWeather may either be funded or in the process of seeking funding. 

(More information: http://hiweather.net/Lists/16.html)



Facebook users


We would like to invite Facebook users to like, follow, and interact with our HIWeather page at https://www.facebook.com/HIWeather


Twitter users

We would like to invite those who use Twitter to communicate about HIWeather relevant topics to use the hashtag #hiweather. 

Follow and interact with our official account @WMO_HIWeather.

WeChat users

HIWeather


The High Impact Weather project (HIWeather) is a ten-year activity within the World Weather Research Programm.

 “To promote cooperative international research to achieve a dramatic increase in resilience to high impact weather, worldwide, through improving forecasts for timescales of minutes to two weeks and enhancing their communication and utility in social, economic and environmental applications.” 


Address: 46, Zhongguancun South Avenue, Haidian District, Beijing 100081, China

Tel: +010 5899 4280

Email Address:hiwico@cma.gov.cn

All prices are in USD. © 2018 Academic exchange activities.. Sitemap

PROCESSES & PREDICTABILITY

AEOLUS CAMPAIGN WILL TAKE PLACE IN SEPTEMBER 2021

After two postponements, the Aeolus Tropical Campaign will finally take place inSeptember 2021 on the Cape Verde Islands, off the coast of West Africa. The German (German Aerospace Center, DLR) and French (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement, SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft will fly out of Sal airport, while the US American DC-8 (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA) will be stationed on the US Virgin Islands and visit Cape Verde for intensive measurement periods. The research flights will be accompanied by radiosonde launches operated by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and by ground-based dust remote sensing measurements from the island of Mindelo (ASKOS: https://askos.space.noa.gr). In addition to Cal/Val activities for the space-borne wind and aerosol lidar on the Aeolus satellite, scientific investigations will target African Easterly and other Equatorial Waves, tropical cyclogenesis, dust outbreaks from the Sahara and mesoscale convective systems.


Preparing equipment for an Aeolus overpass in Mindelo

After two postponements, the Aeolus Tropical Campaign will finally take place inSeptember 2021 on the Cape Verde Islands, off the coast of West Africa. The German (German Aerospace Center, DLR) and French (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement, SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft will fly out of Sal airport, while the US American DC-8 (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA) will be stationed on the US Virgin Islands and visit Cape Verde for intensive measurement periods. The research flights will be accompanied by radiosonde launches operated by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and by ground-based dust remote sensing measurements from the island of Mindelo (ASKOS: https://askos.space.noa.gr). In addition to Cal/Val activities for the space-borne wind and aerosol lidar on the Aeolus satellite, scientific investigations will target African Easterly and other Equatorial Waves, tropical cyclogenesis, dust outbreaks from the Sahara and mesoscale convective systems.

After two postponements, the Aeolus Tropical Campaign will finally take place inSeptember 2021 on the Cape Verde Islands, off the coast of West Africa. The German (German Aerospace Center, DLR) and French (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement, SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft will fly out of Sal airport, while the US American DC-8 (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA) will be stationed on the US Virgin Islands and visit Cape Verde for intensive measurement periods. The research flights will be accompanied by radiosonde launches operated by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and by ground-based dust remote sensing measurements from the island of Mindelo (ASKOS: https://askos.space.noa.gr). In addition to Cal/Val activities for the space-borne wind and aerosol lidar on the Aeolus satellite, scientific investigations will target African Easterly and other Equatorial Waves, tropical cyclogenesis, dust outbreaks from the Sahara and mesoscale convective systems.

After two postponements, the Aeolus Tropical Campaign will finally take place inSeptember 2021 on the Cape Verde Islands, off the coast of West Africa. The German (German Aerospace Center, DLR) and French (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement, SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft will fly out of Sal airport, while the US American DC-8 (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA) will be stationed on the US Virgin Islands and visit Cape Verde for intensive measurement periods. The research flights will be accompanied by radiosonde launches operated by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and by ground-based dust remote sensing measurements from the island of Mindelo (ASKOS: https://askos.space.noa.gr). In addition to Cal/Val activities for the space-borne wind and aerosol lidar on the Aeolus satellite, scientific investigations will target African Easterly and other Equatorial Waves, tropical cyclogenesis, dust outbreaks from the Sahara and mesoscale convective systems.

After two postponements, the Aeolus Tropical Campaign will finally take place inSeptember 2021 on the Cape Verde Islands, off the coast of West Africa. The German (German Aerospace Center, DLR) and French (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement, SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft will fly out of Sal airport, while the US American DC-8 (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA) will be stationed on the US Virgin Islands and visit Cape Verde for intensive measurement periods. The research flights will be accompanied by radiosonde launches operated by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and by ground-based dust remote sensing measurements from the island of Mindelo (ASKOS: https://askos.space.noa.gr). In addition to Cal/Val activities for the space-borne wind and aerosol lidar on the Aeolus satellite, scientific investigations will target African Easterly and other Equatorial Waves, tropical cyclogenesis, dust outbreaks from the Sahara and mesoscale convective systems.